Traditional Sultana Scones

Traditional Sultana Scones can be tricky customers, but choosing the right recipe is really only half of the battle. Much of baking the perfect scone comes down to technique, but fortunately, I have spent many many years refining these. So in this week’s recipe, let me show you how you can use all of the hints and tips I have learned and developed over the last however many years to achieve the perfect Traditional Sultana Scones.

Is there anything more quintessentially British than a freshly baked scone? Actually, yes – what possibly is even more quintessentially British than a freshly baked scone are the arguments that these humble little bakes can cause.

Does scone rhyme with ‘gone’ or does it rhyme with ‘cone’?

Does one include sultanas or not?

Where DID it originate from?

And quite possibly the most contentious discussion of all… is it cream first or jam first?

I’m going to be very transparent with you… I have ALWAYS said scone to rhyme with ‘gone’, I will always choose Traditional Sultana Scones over plain ones and I am firmly in the #creamfirst camp, but rather than get into a row with you all, shall we get stuck into the recipe?

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Traditional Sultana Scones


  • Author: Mr Baker's Cakes
  • Prep Time: 20mins
  • Cook Time: 10mins
  • Total Time: 30mins
  • Yield: 10 1x
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Description

Traditional Sultana Scones can be tricky customers, but choosing the right recipe is really only half of the battle. Much of baking the perfect scone comes down to technique, but fortunately, I have spent many many years refining these. So in this week’s recipe, let me show you how you can use all of the hints and tips I have learned and developed over the last however many years to achieve the perfect Traditional Sultana Scones.


Ingredients

Units Scale

Ingredients:

  • 175ml whole milk
  • 1tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 350g self-raising flour
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 85g chilled butter (cubed)
  • 3 tbsp caster sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 100g sultanas
  • 1 beaten egg (to glaze)

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 200°C fan (220°C/gas mark 6) and place a baking tray inside to warm.

Add the lemon juice to the milk and set aside until it begins to separate.

Tip the flour, salt and baking powder into a large bowl and loosely mix them together.

Add the butter, then rub it into the dry ingredients with your fingers, until the mixture looks like breadcrumbs.

Add the sugar and stir it through with your fingers before setting the bowl aside while we prepare the wet ingredients.

Make a well in the centre of the dry mix and pour in the wet ingredients (the milk and lemon juice mix, and the vanilla), as well as the sultanas (these can be omitted if preferred).

Use a knife to bring the mixture together, until it starts to form into large lumps.

Use your hand to squeeze the scone mixture into one soft ball, being careful not to overwork the mixture, before turning it out onto a lightly floured work surface.

Rather than rolling out the mixture, very gently press out the scone mixture to a depth of around 2-3cm.

Use a floured 5cm round pastry cutter to cut out your scones, ensuring that you do not twist the cutter as you cut.

Press any remaining mixture back together and repeat until it is all used up.

Brush the tops of your scones with beaten egg, ensuring that you do not allow it to run down the sides (as this can inhibit the rise).

Dust the preheated baking tray with a little flour and add the scones. Bake in the preheated oven for around ten minutes until well risen and golden.

To serve, cut or tear the scones in half, topping each half with a generous serving of clotted cream and a spoonful of jam.

Notes

Your scones are best enjoyed on the day of baking (ideally fresh from the oven), but they can be kept in an airtight container for 2-3 days. To refresh them before serving, place them back in the oven at 140°C for 5-10 minutes.

  • Category: Afternoon Tea

Keywords: British Scones, British Scone Recipe, Afternoon Tea Recipes, Traditional British Bakes

If you would like to see me making a similar recipe to this one, where I show you all of my scone hints and tips in a bit more detail, you can check out this video on YouTube.

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